Category: NYC neighborhoods

Neighborhood history: Sunset Park, Brooklyn

Written by Isabel Kaufman The ride to meet my friends in Sunset Park is quiet: past the warehouses, past the water, to the orderly residential streets. History is repeating: Sunset Park has long been characterized by the comings and goings of its population, and its soul determined by immigrant populations that have lived there. This is still true. Today, people come and go from Sunset Park to visit the namesake park and try out ethnic restaurants in Brooklyn’s Chinatown (along...

The Rockaways: From Irish Town to 21st century surf spot

Written by Edil Cuepo         “Chewin’ at a rhythm on my bubble gum The sun is out, I want some It’s not hard, not far to reach We can hitch a ride to Rockaway Beach” “Rockaway Beach” – Ramones, 1977           Sitting some twenty miles away from midtown Manhattan and facing the raging Atlantic, the Rockaway Beach Peninsula is New York’s summer haven. Boasting seven miles of beachfront, Rockaway beach is the only...

Then and now: The story of Jackson Heights

Written by Manmeet Sahni   Jackson Heights, Queens is an ethnic mélange of several world cultures. The neighborhood’s landmark buildings hint at its rich history. Recently, waves of immigrants have added to the neighborhood’s texture through an overlapping of ethnic sights, sounds, and smells. The earlier immigrant communities — Italian, Jewish, and Irish — cohabit harmoniously with newer waves of immigrants from countries like India, Pakistan, Thailand, and many countries in South and Central America. The neighborhood is a viaduct...

Deutschland in the US, Part II: Coming to New York

Written by Sabrina Axster This is the second installment of our History of German Immigrants series. Read the first installment. Germans contributed to the creation of New Amsterdam in the early 1620s. But immigrants from Germany first began to settle in Manhattan in high numbers in the 1830s. By 1855, the city had the third largest population of Germans in the world after Berlin and Vienna (roughly 30 percent of NYC’s inhabitants were first- or second-generation German immigrants) and by...